Internet dating con artists

The 2 exchanged photos and talked about meeting someday, and he confided that he had some financial problems arising out of his divorce.

But when she shared his messages with a friend, the friend questioned his motives and authenticity."She pointed out that he wrote English like it was a 2nd language," says Connie, who broke off the correspondence. Now, she's convinced the man's identity was not only fake, but that he was targeting her."He brought up the money thing right off the bat," she says.

Richie said he was from Milford, Mass., but that he was out of the country on a big construction job.

He was helping build a stadium in Nigeria, he said. I had no qualms whatsoever cashing (the money orders)," Smalley said.

The only way to avoid an online romance scam is to be aware of their occurrences and also to know how to spot them before they begin.

While online dating is no longer taboo (more than 65 percent of Your Tango readers agree, according to our survey), the concept does still prompt feelings of distrust or wariness. Other We met one year out of my hellacious breast cancer experience; I was a new survivor fresh off of chemotherapy. Alex Lee found me in an online art gallery, saw my gothic artwork and pinned me immediately for the sucker I would end up being.

Noticing What Isn't Right Engaging in Conversation Meeting the Person Community Q&A For most of us, finding love on the internet can be a gift from heaven.

For others, however, it can be a life-ruining decision – leaving us penniless, heartbroken and with many more problems heading our way.

A recent study indicates that up to 10 percent of Americans use online dating websites or mobile applications.As more of our friends meet the loves of their lives on sites on OKCupid and Match.com, our virtual guards remain up like invisible force fields. I would come to find later that the Alex persona had been tweaked to suit my fantasy. Alex happened to be a man who suffered terribly from a fatal disease, and after a brief online courtship, he lulled me into believing I was one of the only things that mattered in his life. Alex Lee described himself as a slim, handsome, young, autistic man who was not only a victim of abject poverty, but was dying of terminal leukemia as well. His voice, with its sultry Southern drawl, was naturally low and distinctly masculine.I fell in love with Alex and spent years in an online relationship with him. I wasn't looking for a real-life affair; I was looking for exactly what I got: an online romance with a person I believed to be as vulnerable as I was.I thought I'd found a friend, someone who had suffered as I did — someone who, in his way, could love me.And because I believed Alex was not long for this world, I wanted to help. But Alex would never show his photo to his new friends.