Radiometric dating the age of the earth

Scientists have settled on the age of the earth of about 4.6 billion years as a result of research started almost 50 years ago.

This conclusion was based upon carefully designed and conducted experiments that compared the ratios in rock samples of parent elements to daughter elements ( some of which would have been from radioactive decay of the parent, some of which may have been present in the sample at the time of formation).

By 1907 study of the decay products of uranium (lead and intermediate radioactive elements that decay to lead) demonstrated to B. Boltwood that the lead/uranium ratio in uranium minerals increased with geologic age and might provide a geological dating tool.Among the best-known techniques are radiocarbon dating, potassium-argon dating and uranium-lead dating.By allowing the establishment of geological timescales, it provides a significant source of information about the ages of fossils and the deduced rates of evolutionary change.Unfortunately, the age cannot be computed directly from material that is solely from the Earth.There is evidence that energy from the Earth's accumulation caused the surface to be molten.