Teen dating and violence

Many teens do not report it because they are afraid to tell friends and family. Youth who experience dating violence are more likely to experience the following: Communicating with your partner, managing uncomfortable emotions like anger and jealousy, and treating others with respect are a few ways to keep relationships healthy and nonviolent.

A 2011 CDC nationwide survey found that 23% of females and 14% of males who ever experienced rape, physical violence, or stalking by an intimate partner, first experienced some form of partner violence between 11 and 17 years of age. Teens receive messages about how to behave in relationships from peers, adults in their lives, and the media. Risks of having unhealthy relationships increase for teens who — Dating violence can be prevented when teens, families, organizations, and communities work together to implement effective prevention strategies.

Welcome to one of the most challenging phases of parenting—adolescence.

In all likelihood, your young teen is experiencing significant emotional, psychological and physical changes.

If you need support there are people and resources available to help.

Let him or her know when you truly care for someone you don’t hurt them or try to control them.Youths report emotional, physical and sexual abuse In 2012, the National Dating Abuse Helpline was contacted 39,938 times.The 24-hour service is available at at 1-866-331-9474, or by texting "loveis" to 22522.Similar numbers of both sexes say they've been abusers.Additional new research shows teens who abuse their girlfriends and boyfriends often share a past as middle-school bullies.